Doctorate of Philosophy

What is this Programme about?

PhD stands for Doctor of Philosophy which is an abbreviation of the Latin term, (Ph)ilosophiae
(d)octor. The word philosophy here refers to its original Greek meaning: philo (friend or lover
of) Sophia (wisdom).
Despite its name, PhD isn’t actually an Ancient Greek Degree. Instead it’s much more recent development. The PhD was developed in 19 th century Germany, alongside the modern research University. Higher Education had traditionally focused on mastery of an existing body of scholarship and the highest academic rank available was, appropriately enough, a Master Degree. As the focus shifted more into the production of new knowledge and ideas, the PhD degree was brought in to recognize those who demonstrated the necessary skills and expertise.

 

How this Programme Benifit you & your Career?

Unlike most UG and PG programmes, a PhD is a pure research degree. But that doesn’t mean that the scholar will just spend three years locked away in a library or laboratory. In fact, the modern PhD is a diverse and varied qualification with many different components. Whereas the second or the third year of a taught degree look quite a lot like the first ( with more modules and casework at a higher level) a PhD moves through a series of stages.
PhD Helps To
  1. Develops Advanced Problem-Solving Skills
  2. Provides Skills that Translate Across Industries
  3. Creates Opportunities in Both academic and Non-Academic settings
  4. Continues Development of Critical Communication Skills
  5. Potential to Increase Credibility and Opportunity

 

Programme Contents:

A typical PhD normally involves:

  • Carrying out a literature review ( a survey of current scholarship in your filed)
  • Conducting original research and collecting your results
  • Producing a thesis that presents your conclusions
  • Writing up your thesis and submitting it as a dissertation
  • Defending your thesis in an oral viva voice exam.

Professional development, networking and communication.

Traditionally, the PhD has been viewed as a training procwss, preparing students for careers in academic research.

The modern Phd is also viewed as a more flexible qualification. Not all doctoral graduates end up working in higher education. Many follow alternative careers that are either related to their subject of specialization or draw upon the advanced research skills their PhD has developed.

PhD programmes have begun to reflect this. Many now emphasize transferrable skills or include specific training units designed to help students communicate and apply their research beyond the university.

What all of this means is that very few PhD experience are just about researching and writing a thesis.

The likelihood is that the research scholars will also perform some (or all) of the following during their PhD.

  • Teaching - PhD researchers are often given the opportunity to teach undergraduates at their university. This generally involves leading small group teaching exercises, demonstrating methods and experiments and provide mentoring. The work is usually paid and is increasingly accompanied by formal training and evaluation.
  • Conference participation - The research scholars will be at the cutting edge of their field, doing original research and producing new results. This means that their work will be of interest to other scholars and that their research would be worth presenting at academic conferences.
  • Publication - Research scholars will also get the opportunity to publish their work in academic journals, books, or other media. This can be a challenging process. The scholars will be judged according to the same high standards as any other scholar’s and will normally go through extensive peer review processes.

But it is also highly rewarding. Seeing ones work publish ‘in print’ is an incredible validation of their PhD research and a definite boost to their academic CV. These experiences will be an important part of their development as researchers and will enhance the value of their PhD regardless of their career plans.

 

Fees Structure:

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All 50 Courses

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Teaching Faculities

Joutishan Dutta
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Bandana Dutta
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Ruma Devi
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Kharaibam Surjaya
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Kunal Guha Thakurta
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Kandarpa Kalita
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